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Hey Kristian here from TriSpecific your triathlon lifestyle platform

Over the coming weeks I’m going to talk lots about bottlenecks or should I say the removal of things impeding you in achieving peak human performance.

In fact with our Fat Black Podcast, Pete and I have just wrapped up some short interviews with a lot of smart, intelligent folks on bottlenecks to health and performance. These will be available soon and for free as our gift to you.

Today I want to talk about an area that greatly impedes athletes performances.

And that is pacing.

There is no denying that to reach your goals you need to be able to race fast.

But how many athletes do we see that are strong and fast in their training sessions but seem to fall short on game day?

It’s a lot. Actually it’s a helluva lot.

See we can be strong in isolation or even in a brick session because those sessions only go for a number of hours and not over an iron distance race time.

So all these athletes fall apart in the latter stages of racing (or even in each component sports of the race right) because they just haven’t developed form under duress. That is key.

It’s so easy to go fast over a shorter period of time because fatigue hasn’t fully compounded yet. But when it does… this is when we see athletes fall apart.

Right.. Completely just implode.

So we see athletes swim stroke go to shit when they swim the first 400 way too hard or because they just have not done the required swim work because they erroneously think the swim being such a small percentage of that day that’s just not the important and it’s truly important, and then we see them chewing handle bars from about 120km or (75mi) into the bike because they have just started too hard and many times we see them falling apart before they have even hit the half mark in the marathon.

And this is even true for half distance racing or shorter but the effects are just bigger when it comes to iron distance racing.

Being able to hold your form as you levels of fatigue grow is the key to being fast in this sport.

The biggest mistake I see as a coach and honestly a mistake I made a lot in my earlier days is bullshitting yourself with what you consider easy.

The easy is too hard and tires you out too much before the real work needs to be done.

In training and racing it is good to start strong but finishing strong. Well that is epic.

Most athletes cannot finish strong and it lets them down big time.

The key to becoming an athlete capable of finishing strong and thus finishing fast, is really this…

Is being brutally honest with yourself in how your efforts feel in the day to day.

You need to stop pegging paces / watts etc on what you want to see as your intuitive efforts or what you think your paces should be for easy, moderate, mod-hard and hard.

Todays easy could be tomorrow’s moderate, it could even be hard because of so many different factors. Nutrition, sleep quality, and numerous other stressors that will impact your efforts in the day to day.

If you pace honestly in what you feel today in the moment. Over the long haul of great training consistency everything will fall into place.

Especially when you start each session truly truly easy.

There are even more benefits than just not tiring yourself out too quickly and then training bad form into the body when you’re trashed.

There is the benefits of better fuel utilization from getting the body primed with a longer warm up and sparing your muscle and liver glycogen to be used when it truly counts.

more on that in another video.

Going hard and fast all the time is a sure fire way that you’re gonna fall apart in your race.

When it counts and when it’s highly important to you. And we don’t want to do that. Because we want to go fast.

So focus in on training consistency and starting truly easy.

Focus on pushing hard when it counts.

Build your effort progressively throughout your sessions so you can train your muscles and mind to function under duress.

Going too hard too early means you cannot condition your muscles appropriately to handle the demands you want to place upon them and it will screw with your mental state too.

So drop your ego at the door. Focus in on you and in on the moment, delay gratification and build your form under duress by being brutally honest with yourself and your pacing.

Again this is Kristian from TriSpecific and I look forward to sharing more great tips to help you become the best athlete you can be.